A recent report on female CEOs noted that they are more likely to be fired than their male counterparts—38 percent axed, compared to male figure of 27 percent (as seen in the chart above). There are varied reasons for this state of affairs, among them that female CEOs are often hired from outside a company rather than promoted from within, leading to a shakier cultural fit—itself a reflection on the gendered workings of corporations. But there’s no question that ingrained expectations about What Women Do bumping up against those of What Leaders Do cause friction.
Read "Like a Boss: Five Reasons Why Jill Abramson’s Firing Matters." High-res

A recent report on female CEOs noted that they are more likely to be fired than their male counterparts—38 percent axed, compared to male figure of 27 percent (as seen in the chart above). There are varied reasons for this state of affairs, among them that female CEOs are often hired from outside a company rather than promoted from within, leading to a shakier cultural fit—itself a reflection on the gendered workings of corporations. But there’s no question that ingrained expectations about What Women Do bumping up against those of What Leaders Do cause friction.

Read "Like a Boss: Five Reasons Why Jill Abramson’s Firing Matters."